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Somebody explain this draft to me


More by Ed Fulda
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This was a strange draft for me to understand. For one thing, I was on a business trip to Boston (In fact, I wrote this piece while sitting at my gate in Logan Airport). On the other hand, it wouldn't have made any difference where I was when the draft was held. The Chiefs' draft made no sense whatsoever.

Going into the draft, KC really needed a top-flight wide receiver, a man-to-man cover corner, a run-stopping defensive tackle, and depth at defensive end and linebacker. A lesser need was some additional depth at offensive tackle, especially since starting right tackle, John Tait, signed with the Bears.

Admittedly, KC was not in a position to draft one of the elite receivers or corners from the #30 position in the first round, but, as it turned out, they could have selected Rashaun Woods, the Oklahoma State wideout.

So what happened? The team trades its first round pick to the Lions for a second and fourth round pick in this year’s draft and a fifth in the 2005 draft. Maybe not the smartest move the team could have made, but it didn’t appear to be a disastrous move either. The disaster occurred as soon as the team selected its first two players. Before the draft was over, disaster gave way to absolute travesty.

The first second-round pick, DT Junior Siavii, could have been taken at least a round later. According to the Chiefs, Siavii has the potential to be the big immovable object in the middle of the defensive line that will keep teams from running against the Chiefs. Maybe, but according to others, Siavii lacks discipline about his weight and his conditioning. He has also had off-the-field problems, having been arrested in January for assaulting a woman outside a bar. It smells like Siavii a better chance of turning into another Gilbert Brown or a Chester McGlockton. In other words, a lard bucket that can be an effective player for 10-15 plays a game before he runs out of gas or his attention span reaches its limit.

The second second-round pick, TE Kris Wilson, made absolutely no sense whatsoever. The Chiefs already have Tony Gonzalez, Jason Dunn, and Billy Baber. What kind of playing time is Wilson going to get? I suppose he could be moved to fullback, but there’s no evidence that he can be an effective lead blocker for Priest Holmes. The pick was even more galling since Keary Colbert (the USC wideout) was still available.

Finally, in the third round, KC drafted a player that made sense – linebacker, Keyaron Fox. He’s somewhat on the small side at 6-2, 227, but he provides instant depth and has the potential to become an impact player.

Apparently success in the third round did not inspire the team to use logic in the fourth as the team selected a spindly wide receiver who has speed to burn and runs sloppy pass routes, Sammie Parker, and a defensive end who could only bench press 225 lbs a paltry 13 times at the Combine and has had off-the-field problems, Jared Allen.

KC finally made a smart move and traded its fifth round pick (along with a fourth rounder in the 2005 draft) to the Eagles for G-T John Welbourn. The trade looks good when you consider that Welbourn has been a starter in Philly, but you have to wonder why the Eagles didn’t ask for more in return. Let’s not even go there.

Jeris McIntyre, the wide receiver selected in the sixth round, is a sloppy route runner with suspect hands – just what the team needed. Seventh round pick, T Kevin Sampson of Syracuse, was labeled with the dreaded “vastly under-rated” tag that seems to doom a lot of players. What do you want to bet that he’s cut fairly early?

No top-notch wide receiver. No cornerbacks. A defensive tackle who may eat himself out of the league. A defensive end who can be out-muscled by a quarterback. A tight end who will have trouble getting on the field. No matter how you look it, this was a rotten draft.






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